Sunday, November 20, 2016

My basement darkroom



In my cellar I have a small half bath that is never used. I recently decided that it would make a suitable location for a small darkroom space. With a little preparation I was soon back into developing my own images.

The nice thing about this particular space in my house is that it naturally resides in darkness. Being in the cellar there are no windows to worry about. What little light leakage there was, like around the door and in one small corner, was easily remedied with minor alterations. Another nice feature about this setup is that I have ready access to running water. A necessity for rinsing between development baths. I'll write more about that in a separate article.

My decision for setting up a darkroom came about out of necessity for developing some new direct positive paper from Galaxy Paper, a Kickstarter campaign I had supported. For my support I received a package of 25 sheets of 4x5 paper and the required chemicals to develop them. Now that I had the space it was time to do some shopping.

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Getting back to analog



Several years ago I purchased a used large format camera and had it modified to accept my dSLR camera (seen here). I basically turned a 4x5 view camera into a very large tilt shift lens. It serves its purpose. I now have a full range of movements not available in a standard tilt-shift. For one, a tilt-shift lens can tilt and shift or swing and shift. It just can't do all three. On my system I have tilt, swing, shift, rise and fall on both the front standard and rear standard.

Now, if all this sounds like gibberish to you take a few minutes and google these terms. While this has nothing to do with the real subject of this post, it's always good to learn a little something in the process. In truth, I want to talk about putting my large format camera back to use as it was originally intended, to shoot 4x5 film. Or, as in my case, 4x5 photo paper (think pinhole cameras).

Friday, June 10, 2016

Using layer masks to composite an image


One of our more popular events is the Multiplicity shoot. This is a fun selfie portrait event where we set up our cameras, take multiple photos of ourselves and combine them into a single frame so it looks like we're interacting with our twins. At right is an example of one my grandson and I did together a few years ago.

While it may seem complicated, the editing part is quite simple. I'll walk you through the steps to accomplish this effect.

Monday, April 4, 2016

A Day with Lindsay Adler


Sue Fenton heads up Shutter-Buds on Meetup.com, a local photography group, and she has a knack for putting together some great meetups. If you are a local hobbyist photographer and don't know Sue or her group I strongly suggest checking her out.

This past Saturday she, and a small crew of volunteers, put together a fantastic event featuring the very talented and inspirational, New York based fashion photographer, Lindsay Adler. Miss Adler is a Canon Explorer of Light photographer, educator and just an all around really great person. She is open and sharing and can probably inspire a dead person to get up and start dancing. She is that good.

The event took place at one of the most unique venues I have been to in a long time. The place is called Trinity on Main, located in New Britain, CT, and is a church that has been converted to a multi use event space. While still operating as a church for the United Methodist Church, they expanded to serve as a cultural center to foster the arts in their local community. It's a great place to see theatrical productions, musicians, operas and so much more.

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Merging two images for greater impact


I'm a firm believer that extra images (seconds) from a photo shoot should be saved. For a while at least or until you know you will never need them. The reason I stand on this is that seconds have proven to be invaluable on many circumstances in my past. Often it's a client preferring one of my seconds rather than the image I picked. The other common circumstance is the need to use some element from one of my seconds to fix an issue with the principal shot.

Just recently I found myself in a situation where I couldn't decide which of two images was the keeper and which was the second. In the end I decided they would both be my seconds. Here's what I mean.